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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending February 6, 2016)

Continued Warmth and Below Normal Snowfall Supported Store Traffic in Canada.  

Canada had its warmest start to February since 2006, with most major markets experiencing warmer temperatures than LY.

Halifax had its warmest start to February since 1983, Montreal and Ottawa since 1991.

Snowfall continued to be limited as Canada experienced its least February week 1 snowfall since 2012, challenging demand for products such as shovels and ice melt.

Rainfall trended below LY, but above normal for the first week of February. Quebec had its wettest start to February since 2001. 

For reference, last year, Canada was colder than normal, focused in the East. Snowfall was the most since 1982 and rainfall was the most in in over 55 years.

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending February 6, 2016)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending February 6, 2016)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending January 23, 2016)

Colder Temperatures Compared to Last Year Across North America Drove Favorable Demand for Seasonal Items. 

Canada had its coldest third week of January in two years, although warmer than normal.

Edmonton trended coldest since 2012 and Calgary since 2013. Most other major cities were coldest in two years.

Conversely, Vancouver trended warmest since 2010. Snowfall was the least for January week 3 in three years.

Despite the lower than normal amounts, Toronto, Calgary, Winnipeg, Montreal, Ottawa, Halifax, and Edmonton all received measurable snowfall. 

For reference, last year, Canada was warmest for the week since 2010. Rainfall was the most for the 3rd week of January since 2006, while snowfall was the least since 2010.

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending January 23, 2016)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending January 23, 2016)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending January 9, 2016)

Coldest Air of the Season in the East Boosted Winter Demand, Although Comped a Frigid LY. Limited Snowfall Across the Continent.

Canada Much Warmer vs. LY, Least Snow Since 2008. Almost all major markets saw much above LY warmth, challenging demand for winter softlines.

Vancouver was the only major market to trend colder than LY, and had its most January week 1 snowfall since 2009.

Halifax and Ottawa both saw their least snowfall since 2008, limiting sales of snow removal items.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was colder than normal with the most snowfall since 2000 and above normal rainfall. 

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending January 9, 2016)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending January 9, 2016)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending December 26, 2015)

The Warmest Christmas Eve in Quebec City, Montreal, and Toronto in 55+ Years! The Driest Christmas Day in Canada in 55+ Years. Nationally Canada Trended Cooler than Last Year.

Warm and Dry in Canada. While nationally, Canada trended colder than LY, major markets including Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec City, and Montreal all had their warmest December week 4 in 55+ years. Conversely, Vancouver was coldest since 2009. Both rain and snow trended below LY and normal for the week.

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day trended colder than LY, although warmer than normal.Quebec City, Montreal, and Toronto were each warmest in over 55 years on Christmas Eve supporting traffic for last minute purchases. Canada had its driest Christmas Day in 55+ years with no major markets recording snowfall.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was the warmest since 1994 and Christmas Eve & Christmas Day were warmest in 50 years. 

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending December 26, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending December 26, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending December 12, 2015)

Summer in December! Warmest Week 2 of December Across North America in Over 55 Years Stifled Seasonal Demand. Limited Rain and Least Snowfall in 55+ Years Supported Store Traffic.

Warm and Dry in Canada Boosted Store Traffic. Canada felt the heat, recording the warmest 2nd week of December in 55+ years, keeping seasonal demand soft. Toronto, Montreal, Quebec City, and Ottawa had the strongest anomalies, and were all warmest for the week in over 55 years.

Nationally, conditions were driest since 2005, while snowfall was the least in over 55 years, aiding store traffic. The only major markets to record snow, albeit limited, were Edmonton, Winnipeg, and Calgary.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was warmest for the week since 1999, with the most rainfall since 2008 and the least snowfall since 2011. 

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending December 12, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending December 12, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending November 28, 2015)

Canada Warm and Dry vs. LY. Cold Conditions Focused in the West.

Canada Mostly Warm. Canada had its warmest end to November in 4 years with strong warmth in interior and eastern markets. Toronto was warmest since 2011. Cold comparisons were focused in the West. Vancouver had its coldest end to November since 2010, helping winter businesses.

Rainfall was below LY although above normal. Snow was the least to end November since 2009.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was warmest since 2011, wettest since 2003. 

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending November 28, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending November 28, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending November 14, 2015)

Seasonal Demand Stayed on the ‘Struggle Bus.’ Warmest and Wettest Week 2 of November Since 2011 in Canada.

A Warm Day for Honor. Remembrance Day was the warmest since 2002 and driest since 2010.

Feeling the Warmth in Canada. Canada had its warmest and wettest 2nd week of November since 2011. Warmer temperatures compared to LY were felt in all major markets. Edmonton had its warmest 2nd week of November since 2008, Winnipeg since 2010, Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, Calgary, and Halifax all since 2011. Ottawa was also the wettest since 1989, Montreal and Toronto since 2008, limiting store traffic. Snowfall in Canada was the least since 2011 and significantly below normal, softening demand for snow removal items. Calgary and Edmonton were the only major markets that had snow. 

For reference, last week last year, Canada had its coldest week 2 of November since 1996, and the snowiest since 1997. Remembrance Day was warmer than 2013 and driest since 2010.

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending November 14, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending November 14, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

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Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending October 31, 2015)

Super Soaker! The Wettest End to October in 55+ Years Limited Store Traffic.

Halloween Weekend Review: Halloween was warmer than LY in Canada.

Canadian Rain. Canada had its wettest end to October in over 55 years. Montreal was wettest since 2006, Vancouver and Winnipeg since 2010. Conversely, Calgary had its driest end to October in 4 years. Temperatures were colder than LY although near normal for the week. Exceptionally warm temperatures were focused in the West as Vancouver had its warmest end to October since 1966. Further east, Toronto was warmest since 2010, limiting fall demand.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was the warmest since 2010. Rainfall was below normal and snowfall the least in 20 years. It was the coldest Halloween since 2010.

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending October 31, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending October 31, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

2015_1103_bww2

Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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Canadian Business Weather Wrap-Up

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WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS (Week Ending October 17, 2015)

Cold Temperatures & Dry Conditions Drove Fall Businesses in the East. Wet Conditions Were Focused in the Prairies & Southeast. Major Markets Trended Cooler Than Last Year.

Blue Jay Days in Canada. Eastern Canada was seeing ‘blue’ from the Jays baseball playoff run as well as a late week shot of cold air, which drove fall product demand. For the week as a whole, Canada trended cooler than LY, although warmer than normal, and the driest since 2009. Of particular note, Montreal had its coldest week 2 of October since 2010 and Toronto was driest since 2009. Early in the week, Canadian Thanksgiving trended the warmest in over 55 years with below normal rainfall.

For reference, last week last year, Canada was warmer and wetter than normal. Canadian Thanksgiving was warmest since 2011; wettest since 2007.

Last Week’s Weather vs. Last Year (Week ending October 17, 2015)

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 WEATHER DRIVEN-DEMAND BY PRODUCT (Week Ending October 17, 2015)

Weather-Driven Demand (WDD) is the measured impact of weather on comp sales (“lift” or “drag”).  It is a numerical representation of the consumer need for a product or service caused by perceived changes in the weather at a time/location intersection.  It does not include any factors other than weather (e.g. price, competition, etc.)  WDD is expressed as percent change from the previous year, either favorable (positive) or unfavorable (negative) for each product or service. 

2015_1020_bww2

Click here to request a Weather Impact Analysis on a product of your choice. Discover how the weather affects customer behavior and your retail business.

Planalytics is more than weather data, we’re weather analytics. For more information, contact us today.

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